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Number of items: 56.
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    Linked Data in the Digital Humanities: Examples, Projects, and Tools
    Harnessing the potential of semantic web technologies to support and diversify scholarship is gaining popularity in the digital humanities. This talk describes a number of projects utilising Linked Data ranging from musicology and library metadata, to the representation of the narrative structure, philological, bibliographical, and museological data of ancient Mesopotamian literary compositions.

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    The narrative of arguing the personalised news
    Bay 9 are hoping to pioneer a way to encourage postgrads and staff in the lab to get over the fear of presenting their work to the group. The members of the bay will each give a 6m40s Pecha Kucha explaining their current research work through pictures. The topics of the pecha kuchas are: - Citizen Participation in News: An analysis of the landscape of online journalism (Jonny) - Argumentation on the Social Web (Tom) - From Narrative Systems to Ubiquitous Computing for Psychology - and everything in between (Charlie) - Is it worth sharing user model data? (Rikki)

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    Anonymisation, Deanonymisation and Data Management
    Speaker: Dr Kieron O'Hara Organiser: Time: 04/02/2015 11:00-11:45 Location: B32/3077 Abstract In order to reap the potential societal benefits of big and broad data, it is essential to share and link personal data. However, privacy and data protection considerations mean that, to be shared, personal data must be anonymised, so that the data subject cannot be identified from the data. Anonymisation is therefore a vital tool for data sharing, but deanonymisation, or reidentification, is always possible given sufficient auxiliary information (and as the amount of data grows, both in terms of creation, and in terms of availability in the public domain, the probability of finding such auxiliary information grows). This creates issues for the management of anonymisation, which are exacerbated not only by uncertainties about the future, but also by misunderstandings about the process(es) of anonymisation. This talk discusses these issues in relation to privacy, risk management and security, reports on recent theoretical tools created by the UKAN network of statistics professionals (on which the author is one of the leads), and asks how long anonymisation can remain a useful tool, and what might replace it.

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    Big Data: Wrongs and Rights by Andrew Cormack (WAIS Seminar)
    Abstract: Big Data has been characterised as a great economic opportunity and a massive threat to privacy. Both may be correct: the same technology can indeed be used in ways that are highly beneficial and those that are ethically intolerable, maybe even simultaneously. Using examples of how Big Data might be used in education - normally referred to as "learning analytics" - the seminar will discuss possible ethical and legal frameworks for Big Data, and how these might guide the development of technologies, processes and policies that can deliver the benefits of Big Data without the nightmares. Speaker Biography: Andrew Cormack is Chief Regulatory Adviser, Jisc Technologies. He joined the company in 1999 as head of the JANET-CERT and EuroCERT incident response teams. In his current role he concentrates on the security, policy and regulatory issues around the network and services that Janet provides to its customer universities and colleges. Previously he worked for Cardiff University running web and email services, and for NERC's Shipboard Computer Group. He has degrees in Mathematics, Humanities and Law.

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    Co-designed platforms for delivering behaviour change interventions: Lessons learnt from the LifeGuide programme
    The LifeGuide research programme is a multidisciplinary initiative led by Professor Lucy Yardley (Psychology) and Dr Mark Weal (Computer Science) at the University of Southampton. We have developed a unique set of open source software tools, that allows intervention designers with no experience of programming to create interactive web-based interventions to support healthy behaviour. In this talk I will give a brief overview of digital behavioural change interventions, describe the LifeGuide platform that has been developed at the University of Southampton, and through a number of exemplar projects discuss some of the lessons learnt from this interdisciplinary collaboration.

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    Consider the Source: In Whose Interests, and How, of Big, Small and Other Data? Exploring data science through wellth scenarios.
    We're not a particularly healthy culture. Our "normal" practices are not optimised for our wellbeing. From the morning commute to the number of hours we believe we need to put in to complete a task that may itself be unreasonable, to the choices we make about time to prepare food to fit into these constraints - all these operations tend to make us feel forced into treating ourselves as secondary to our jobs. How can data help improve our quality of life? FitBits and AppleWatches highlight the strengths and limits of Things that Count, not the least of which is the rather low uptake of things like FITBITS and apple watches. So once we ask the question about how data might improve quality of life, we may need to add the caveat: pervasively, ubiquitously, in the rich variety of contexts that isn't all about Counting. And once we think about such all seeing all knowing environments, we then need to think about privacy and anonymity. That is: does everything have to be connected to the internet to deliver on a vision of improved quality of life through data? And if there is a Big Ubiquity - should we think about inverting new norms, like how to make personal clouds and personal data stores far more easy to manage - rather than outsourcing so much data and computation? In this short talk, I'd like to consider three scenarios about Going where too few humans have gone before to help others The challenges of qualitative data Supporting privacy and content to motivate thinking about data capture, re-use and re-presentation, and opportunities across ECS for machine learning, AI, infoviz and hci.

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    Fake News: Fake Causes & Real Solutions
    Recent elections, including the 2016 UK Referendum on Brexit and the 2017 US election, have seen a great deal of discussion about fake news. How exactly has the discussion of fake become so central to debates about modern democracy? In this talk, Nick Anstead will examine the difficulty of defining fake news and the evidence that it has political consequences. He will argue that there is too great a tendency to see the problem of fake news as technological, when the reality is that the underlying causes are political, social and economic. This analysis has important ramifications for how societies seek to combat fake news and ensure a knowledgeable and engaged electorate.

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    Fun with GPS glacier tracking in Iceland
    This summer I went back to basics to install a glacier movement sensor system Iceland - sponsored by Formula E. This followed on from a very simple GPS tracker we installed on a Greenland Iceberg last year. We chose some accurate dGPS units, the Iridium short messaging service and a micropython based microcontroller. Putting it all together and installing is a whole story in itself however! So this seminar will mainly be a story of design issues, sand in the keyboard, off-road driving, some quadcopter imaging and finally some actual results.

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    How Minecraft Affects How Young People Learn About Computer Science
    Abstract: As one of the newest art forms available to young people, gaming has become an increasing influence on young people’s education, even if not used in a classroom environment. This talk aims to explore examples of how video games have changed how young people understand and learn about certain subjects, with particular focus on how the indie title Minecraft allows them to learn about the world of Computer Science and how groups are looking to forward the cause of education though games.

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    Intern Summer 2014
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    Joining the dots: Connecting the social determinants and physiological effects of air quality in offices
    Feeling drowsy at work? Despite findings that poor indoor air quality causes cognitive performance decline, the average office-worker has no access to information on the quality of air in the room until it becomes poor enough to cause discomfort. In this talk, I discuss our user-centred research from the REFRESH project, which joins the dots between the individual and social factors that affect perception of IAQ, and the human physiological responses to changes in air quality. This involves (1) physiological measurement such as (EEG) to detect the effect of air quality on drowsiness, (2) qualitative methods to understanding the social factors which influence air quality in offices, and (3) designing ambient technology which visualises CO2 of an office- an indicator of indoor air quality. At the end of the talk you will have some actions for how you can detect- and do something about- the air quality of your office; how easily you can incorporate qualitative methods into your research and use technology to understand your users’ needs.

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    Location Aware Narratives: Strange Hypertexts, Sculptural Stories, and Digital Poetics
    Researchers from the Web and Internet Science group have been exploring hypertexts and computational narrative for nearly two decades. In this seminar we present our most recent work on the Leverhulme Trust funded project StoryPlaces (http://storyplaces.soton.ac.uk/) where we have investigated the poetics and technology associated with location aware narratives. Location Aware Narratives are a type of Strange Hypertext (hypertexts that go beyond traditional node-link models) because location aware stories reflects the physical context of the reader - examples include tour guides where the reader is required to be in a particular location to access certain pages, interactive fiction where location is used to set the tone or backdrop to the drama, or dynamic narrative that changes or responds to the user’s wanderings. The StoryPlaces system is driven by a Sculptural Hypertext engine which models narrative as a state machine and delivers a mobile storytelling experience through a location aware web application. StoryPlaces is based on a general model for location aware narrative called "Canyons, Deltas, Plains" that we have shown to support the structures used in a broad sample of location aware storytelling systems. By working with both student and professional writers we have expanded our knowledge of the common patterns and structures used by authors in location aware narrative, and have begun to see how the structures of the narrative and the topology of the locations involved are intrinsically connected, and that the 'poetics of space' are a fundamental part of this medium. As part of the seminar we will demonstrate the StoryPlaces reader, and show how these patterns have begun to inform the design of our authorship tools.

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    Making data useful and usable
    Data is ubiquitous; everyone has it and deals with it. However, just because everyone deals with it, doesn't mean that we naturally handle it well or efficiently. In this talk, Adriane Chapman will introduce herself to the WAIS group and describe her interest in making data useful and usable. She will describe her past work in provenance, and her current work in annotations, provenance and data modelling.

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    Mining Events from Multimedia streams, Jon Hare
    peaker(s): Jon Hare Organiser: Time: 25/06/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B32/3077 Abstract The aggregation of items from social media streams, such as Flickr photos and Twitter tweets, into meaningful groups can help users contextualise and effectively consume the torrents of information on the social web. This task is challenging due to the scale of the streams and the inherently multimodal nature of the information being contextualised. In this talk I'll describe some of our recent work on trend and event detection in multimedia data streams. We focus on scalable streaming algorithms that can be applied to multimedia data streams from the web and the social web. The talk will cover two particular aspects of our work: mining Twitter for trending images by detecting near duplicates; and detecting social events in multimedia data with streaming clustering algorithms. I'll will describe in detail our techniques, and explore open questions and areas of potential future work, in both these tasks.

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    More women in informatics research and education
    Speaker: Lynda Hardman Organiser: Time: 04/02/2015 12:30-13:30 Location: B32/3077 Abstract The challenges of addressing gender inequalities in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine is widely acknowledged. We currently hold a bronze award and ECS is one of many academic units in the University which has gained Athena Swan Charter status. In this seminar, Professor Lynda Hardman, Chair of the Informatics Europe working group "Women in Informatics Research and Education” will be explaining the causes of issued underlying gender inequality and constructive routes to addressing this important agenda. In undertaking to commit to an action plan which is a prerequisite of gaining charter status, the University or academic department agreed to accept and incorporate the Athena Swan six principles listed below: * To address gender inequalities requires commitment and action from everyone, at all levels of the organisation * To tackle the unequal representation of women in science requires changing cultures and attitudes across the organisation * The absence of diversity at management and policy-making levels has broad implications which the organisation will examine * The high loss rate of women in science is an urgent concern which the organisation will address * The system of short-term contracts has particularly negative consequences for the retention and progression of women in science, which the organisation recognises * There are both personal and structural obstacles to women making the transition from PhD into a sustainable academic career in science, which require the active consideration of the organisation. This seminar is designed to provide an opportunity to explore these issues NOTE: Lynda will be basing here talk on some of the work she directed as chair of the "Women in Informatics Research and Education” working group. The purpose of the working group is to actively participate and promote actions that contribute to improve gender balance in Information and Communication Sciences and Technologies. The first concrete result of the working group's activities was the publication of the booklet "More Women in Informatics Research and Education" in 2013. The booklet is a compact source of clear and simple best practices to deans and heads of departments that aim to increase the participation of women as both students and employees in their institutions. Many tips included were also inspired by colleagues already in leading positions who have already implemented actions in their institutions to attract more women and ensure their continued participation in the organization at commensurate ratios with their male colleagues. The booklet is endorsed by the European Commission and features a foreword by Neelie Kroes, Vice-President of the European Commission, responsible for the Digital Agenda.

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    Password cracking for fun and profit
    Abstract Passwords are the most common form of authentication, and most of us will have to log in to several accounts every day which require passwords. Unfortunately, passwords often do not do a good job of proving who we are, and come with a host of usability problems. Probably the only reason that passwords still exist is that there often isn't a better alternative, so we are likely to be stuck with them for the foreseeable future. Password cracking has been a problem for years, and becomes more problematic as computer become more powerful and attackers get a better idea of the sort of passwords people use. This presentation will look at two free password cracking tools: Hashcat and John the Ripper, and how even a non-expert on a laptop (i.e. me) can use them effectively. An introduction to some of the research surrounding the economics and usability of passwords will also be discussed. Note that the speaker is not an expert in this area, so it will be a fairly informal since I'm sure you're all tired after a long term.

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    Pecha Kucha: Bay 8
    Abstract Following the success of Bay 9's Pecha Kucha, this week Bay 8 are providing the next instalment of the newly established tradition of Pecha Kucha. In 6m40s and 20 slides, each member of Bay 8 will introduce themselves, explaining their background and research interests, so you can put a name to the face, and chat after the event if you have common interests. These mini talks aim to support the collaborative nature of WAIS by introducing each member to the wider group. This week the bay members and Pecha Kuchas are: - The Public Health Analogy in Web Security (Huw) - Social Networking Features in Digital Behaviour Change Interventions (Roushdat) - Computers, Psychology and a lot of coffee (Anna) - Law, computer science and that annoying thing you have to say you’ve read before you can use a website (Emma)

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    Provenance: Beyond Standardisation
    Abstract: Provenance is a record that describes the people, institutions, entities, and activities, involved in producing, influencing, or delivering a piece of data or a thing in the world. Some 10 years after beginning research on the topic of Provenance, I co-chaired the provenance working group at the World Wide Web Consortium. The working group published 4 recommendations and several notes about the PROV standard for provenance in 2013. In this talk, I will present some use cases for provenance, the PROV standard and some flagship examples of adoption. I will then move onto our current research area in exploiting provenance, in the context of the SmartSociety and ORCHID projects. Doing so, I will present some methods, algorithms, and tools that we have developed in Southampton.

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    Research methods - moving from the lab out 'into the wild'
    Moira McGregor has worked on various projects at the Mobile Life Research Centre including: everyday use of digital maps; the sharing economy; mobile battery maintenance; and speech technology in workplace meetings. What these projects have have in common is a desire to look at the use of mobile technology as it happens in order to understand how users make sense of the technology, and also how users interweave this use with other interactions going on around them at the same time. The above coincides with a general move from studying mobile phone technology in the controlled setting of the lab, to the challenge of devising methods to allow the study of mobile phone use in situ, out ‘in the wild’. This focus on use in situ calls for a focus on working with distributed research methods, including video analysis, interactional and conversational analysis, interviews, and technical probes – all of which have been deployed in Moira’s work in order to give access to moment by moment interaction with mobile technology. The resulting small scale and detailed perspective may be combined to complement the more pervasive approaches of recording mobile phone use by instrumenting technology with sensors and logging use over longer periods, with large cohorts of users. Moira is currently a PhD student at the MobileLife Research Centre in Stockholm. Her work looks at how technology is used in everyday life – from mobile phone use in co-present interaction with others, to how an app like Uber is changing the work practices of taxi drivers. In this seminar, Moira will present some of the research methods used in her studies and some of her preliminary findings.

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    Scalable real-time crisis mapping and analytics of social media streams for disaster management and breaking news
    Real-time geoparsing of social media streams (e.g. Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Flickr, FourSquare) is providing a new 'virtual sensor' capability to end users such as emergency response agencies (e.g. Tsunami early warning centres, Civil protection authorities) and news agencies (e.g. Deutsche Welle, BBC News). Challenges in this area include scaling up natural language processing (NLP) and information retrieval (IR) approaches to handle real-time traffic volumes, reducing false positives, creating real-time infographic displays useful for effective decision support and providing support for trust and credibility analysis using geosemantics. I will present in this seminar on-going work by the IT Innovation Centre over the last 4 years (TRIDEC and REVEAL FP7 projects) in building such systems, and highlights our research towards improving trustworthy and credible of crisis map displays and real-time analytics for trending topics and influential social networks during major news worthy events.

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    Seminar: Symbol Management systems to support democracy in development of an online Symbol Dictionary
    Abstract This seminar will introduce an initial year of research exploring participation in the development of a bilingual symbol dictionary. Symbols can be a communication and literacy ‘lifeline’ for those unable to communicate through speech or writing. We will discuss how an online system has been built to overcome language, cultural and literacy skill issues for a country where 86% are expatriates but the target clients are Arabic born individuals with speech and language impairments. The symbols in use at present are inappropriate and yet there is no democratic way of providing a ‘user voice’ for making choices, let alone easy mechanisms for adapting and sharing newly developed symbols across the nation or extended Arabic world. This project aims to change this situation. Having sourced a series of symbols that could be adapted to suit user’s needs, the team needed to encourage those users, their carers and therapists to vote on whether the symbols would be appropriate and work with those already in use. The first prototype was developed and piloted during the WAISfest in 2013. The second phase needs further voting on the most suitably adapted symbols for use when communicating with others. There is a requirement to have mechanisms for evaluating the outcome of the votes, where symbols fail to represent accurate meanings, have inappropriate colours, representations and actions etc. There also remains the need to collect both quantitative and qualitative data. Not easy in a climate of acceptance of the expert view, a culture where to be critical can be a problem and time is not of the essence.

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    Spatial data integration for mapping progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals
    Abstract: The UN sustainable development goals, an intergovernmental set of 17 aspirational goals and 169 targets to be achieved by 2030, were launched last year. These include ending poverty and malnutrition, improving health and education, and building resilience to natural disasters and climate change. A particular focus across the goals and targets is achievement 'everywhere', ensuring that no one gets left behind and that progress is monitored at subnational levels to avoid national-level statistics masking local heterogeneities. How will this subnational monitoring of progress towards meeting the goals be undertaken when many countries will undertake just a single census in the 2015-2030 monitoring period? Professor Tatem will present an overview of the work of the two organizations he directs; WorldPop ( www.worldpop.org ) and Flowminder ( www.flowminder.org ); in meeting the challenges of constructing consistent, comparable and regularly updated metrics to measure a! nd map progress towards the sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries, and where the integration of traditional and new forms of data, including those derived from satellite imagery, GPS and mobile phones, can play a role.

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    Studying the emergent properties of Social Machines
    In this talk, I will discuss the unexpected uses of social machines, and how individual and collective behaviour on platforms such as Twitter, Wikipedia, and the Zooniverse contribute to their development, success, and failure. Based on these observations, we will explore how we can take advantage of the emergent features and interpretive flexibility of social machines, in order to support current global challenges.

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    Temporal TF-IDF: A High Performance Approach for Event Summarization in Twitter
    In recent years, there has been increased interest in real-world event summarization using publicly accessible data made available through social networking services such as Twitter and Facebook. People use these outlets to communicate with others, express their opinion and commentate on a wide variety of real-world events, such as disasters and public disorder. Due to the heterogeneity, the sheer volume of text and the fact that some messages are more informative than others, automatic summarization is a very challenging task. This paper presents three techniques for summarizing microblog documents by selecting the most representative posts for real-world events (clusters). In particular, we tackle the task of multilingual summarization in Twitter. We evaluate the generated summaries by comparing them to both human produced summaries and to the summarization results of similar leading summarization systems. Our results show that our proposed Temporal TF-IDF method outperforms all the other summarization systems for both the English and non-English corpora as they lead to informative summaries.

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    The Chemistry of Data
    Abstract: In my talk I will discuss the way in which the ideas of the Data Science, Web and Semantic Web, Open Science contribute to new methods and approaches to data driven chemistry and chemical informatics. A key aspect of the discussion will be how to facilitate the improved acquisition and integration and analysis of chemical data in context. I will refer to lesions learnt in the e-Science and Digital Economy (particularly the IT as a Utility Network) programmes and the EDISON H2020 project. Jeremy G. Frey Jeremy Frey obtained his DPhil on experimental and theoretical aspects of van der Waals complexes, in Oxford, followed by a fellowship at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with Yuan Lee. In 1984 he joined the University of Southampton, where he is now Professor of Physical Chemistry and head of the Computational Systems Chemistry Group. His experimental research probes molecular organization from single molecules to liquid interfaces using laser spectroscopy from the IR to soft X-rays. In parallel he investigates how e-Science infrastructure supports intelligent access to scientific data. He is strongly committed to collaborative inter and multi-disciplinary research and is skilled in facilitating communication between diverse disciplines speaking different languages. He has successfully lead several large interdisciplinary collaborative RUCK research grants, from Basic Technology (Coherent Soft X-Ray imaging), e-Science (CombeChem) and most recently the Digital Economy Challenge area of IT as a Utility Network+, where he has successfully created a unique platform to facilitate collaboration across the social, science, engineering and design domains, working with all the research, commercial, third and governmental sectors.

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    The Paradigm of Crowdsourced Systems
    Title: The Paradigm of Crowdsourced Systems Abstract: High acceptance rates of truly personal, portable devices such as smartphones and smart gadgets, along with the successful introduction of DIY computer platforms, like Arduino's and Raspberry Pi's, have lead to an unprecedented abundance of well-connected and well-equipped devices. Crowdsourced Systems is a new system paradigm that seeks to exploit the high availability of such devices and thus change the way data is generated, processed and consumed. In this talk, we will discuss this new paradigm, the challenges and opportunities it poses, review real-world use-cases and present relative on-going standardization efforts. Short CV: Dr. Constantinos Marios Angelopoulos is Lecturer in Computing at Bournemouth University (U.K.) specializing in future and emerging paradigms of computer networks and distributed systems. He is also the Lead Editor of the ITU-T Work Item on Crowdsourced Systems; co-author of the ITU-T Technical Report on “Artificial Intelligence in IoT” and the Vocabulary Co-rapporteur for ITU-T SG20. In the past, he has worked for three years as a postdoctoral researcher at University of Geneva (CH) under the prestigious Swiss Government Excellence Scholarship for Foreign Researchers.

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    Understanding social media in everyday life: Ethnomethodological and conversation analytic perspectives
    Over the last decade, social media has become a hot topic for researchers of collaborative technologies (e.g., CSCW). The pervasive use of social media in our everyday lives provides a ready source of naturalistic data for researchers to empirically examine the complexities of the social world. In this talk I outline a different perspective informed by ethnomethodology and conversation analysis (EMCA) - an orientation that has been influential within CSCW, yet has only rarely been applied to social media use. EMCA approaches can complement existing perspectives through articulating how social media is embedded in everyday life, and how its social organisation is achieved by users of social media. Outlining a possible programme of research, I draw on a corpus of screen and ambient audio recordings of mobile device use to show how EMCA research can be generative for understanding social media through concepts such as adjacency pairs, sequential context, turn allocation / speaker selection, and repair. In doing so, I also raise questions about existing studies of social media use and the way they characterise interactional phenomena.

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    University and College Union
    Unions and collective negotiation are essential in maintaining good working conditions for all staff, in particular those who are on Fixed Term Contracts (FTC) and are often starting out in their academic/research careers. The FTC group is particularly vulnerable to discrimination and the pressure to produce outputs and bring in funding to secure more secure employment. The very nature of being on a FTC greatly reduces the amount of funding sources that can be applied to.This talk provides an overview of the University and College Union (UCU), how it operates, what the benefits are, what we have achieved nationally and at a local level. Joe Viana, a FTC research er at the University, and the FTC rep of the Southampton UCU branch, will be on hand to answer questions and to provide feedback on local and national level activities.The talk should be of interest to all FTC staff, their supervisors and any postgrads considering a research career in higher education.

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    WAIS Seminar Videos
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    WAIS Seminar: Research Discussion: Open Data at the Hampshire Hub
    This is a research discussion about the Hampshire Hub - see http://protohub.net/. The aim is to find out more about the project, and discuss future collaboration and sharing of ideas. Mark Braggins (Hampshire Hub Partnership) will introduce the Hampshire Hub programme, setting out its main objectives, work done to-date, next steps including the Hampshire data store (which will use the PublishMyData linked data platform), and opportunities for University of Southampton to engage with the programme , including the forthcoming Hampshire Hackathons Bill Roberts (Swirrl) will give an overview of the PublishMyData platform, and how it will help deliver the objectives of the Hampshire Hub. He will detail some of the new functionality being added to the platform Steve Peters (DCLG Open Data Communities) will focus on developing a web of data that blends and combines local and national data sources around localities, and common topics/themes. This will include observations on the potential employing emerging new, big data sources to help deliver more effective, better targeted public services. Steve will illustrate this with practical examples of DCLG’s work to publish its own data in a SPARQL end-point, so that it can be used over the web alongside related 3rd party sources. He will share examples of some of the practical challenges, particularly around querying and re-using geographic LinkedData in a federated world of SPARQL end-point.

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    WAIS Seminar:Evaluating the Cognitive Side of Information Interaction
    Abstract In this talk, I'll focus on the work we've been doing on evaluating the cognitive side of dealing with information resources and increasingly complex user interfaces. While we can build increasingly powerful user interfaces, they often come at the cost of simple design and ease of use. I'll describe two specific studies: 1) work on the ORCHID project focused on measuring mental workload during tasks using fNIRS (a blood-oxygen-based brain scanner), and 2) a evaluation metric for measuring how much people learn during tasks. Together these provide advances towards understanding the cognitive side of information interaction, in working towards building better tools for users.

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    WAIS Seminar:Let's SoFWIReD!
    Title: Let’s SoFWIReD! Time: Wed, 21 May 2014 11:00-11:50 Location: Building 32, Room 3077 Speaker: Dr Sepi Chakaveh Abstract The information age as we know it has its roots in several enabling technologies – most of all the World Wide Web – for the provision of truly global connectivity. The emergence of a Web of Big Data in terms of the publication and analysis of Open Data provides new insights about the impact of the Web in our society. The second most important technology in this regard has been the emergence of streaming processes based on new and innovative compression methods such as MP3 so that audio and video content becomes accessible to everyone on the Web. The SoFWIReD team is developing comprehensive, interoperable platforms for data and knowledge driven processing of Open Data and will investigate aspects of collective intelligence. Insights generated in the project will form the basis for supporting companies through consulting, organisational development, and software solutions so that they can master the collective intelligence transition. The seminar will present how the project addresses the research topics of web observatory, dynamic media objects, crowd-sourced open data and Internet services. At the end of a talk a number of demos will be shown in the context of SoFWIReD’s Dynamic Media Object.

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    WAIS Seminar:LinkedTV: Building the Future of Television
    Abstract Broadcast video can be augmented with links to information related to the topics in the video and to other related entities. Viewers are sufficiently digitally literate that they can carry out their own searches during or after a broadcast. We investigate what types of information viewers would actually like to see while being engaged in watching a news broadcast. On the base of this we have designed user interfaces for passive and active uses of a second screen to accompany a news broadcast. A next step is to understand the specific types of information users would like to consult and investigate whether these can be automatically generated.

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    WAIS Seminar:Mathematics for Web Science Part 2
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    WAIS Seminar:Modelling the Web: Examples of modelling language, network evolution and physical-social systems
    Speaker(s): Prof. Steffen Staab Organiser: Dr Tim Chown Time: 23/05/2014 10:30-11:30 Location: B53/4025 Abstract The Web is constructed based on our experiences in a multitude of modalities: text, networks, images, physical locations are some examples. Understanding the Web requires from us that we can model these modalities as they appear on the Web. In this talk I will show some examples of how we model text, hyperlink networks and physical-social systems in order to improve our understanding and our use of the Web.

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    WAIS Seminar:Secure Multi-Party Computation for the Masses
    Speaker(s): Prof. David Evans Organiser: Dr Tim Chown Time: 22/05/2014 10:45-11:45 Location: B53/4025 Abstract Secure multi-party computation enables two (or more) participants to reliably compute a function that depends on both of their inputs, without revealing those inputs to the other party or needing to trust any other party. It could enable two people who meet at a conference to learn who they known in common without revealing any of their other contacts, or allow a pharmaceutical company to determine the correct dosage of a medication based on a patient’s genome without compromising the privacy of the patient. A general solution to this problem has been known since Yao's pioneering work in the 1980s, but only recently has it become conceivable to use this approach in practice. Over the past few years, my research group has worked towards making secure computation practical for real applications. In this talk, I'll provide a brief introduction to secure computation protocols, describe the techniques we have developed to design scalable and efficient protocols, and share some recent results on improving efficiency and how secure computing applications are developed.

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    WAIS Tutorial: Publishing in Top Quality Journals
    The purpose of this seminar session is to share with you some of my experience with publishing in top quality journals. The session will be structured as follows: - Publish or Perish - The CS Debate (conferences vs journals) - Top journals - Multidiciplinary work - The Process

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    WAIS seminar: Alan Walks Wales: Data and Challenges
    Abstract This seminar is a research discussion around a very interesting problem, which may be a good basis for a WAISfest theme. A little over a year ago Professor Alan Dix came to tell us of his plans for a magnificent adventure:to walk all of the way round Wales - 1000 miles 'Alan Walks Wales'. The walk was a personal journey, but also a technological and community one, exploring the needs of the walker and the people along the way. Whilst walking he recorded his thoughts in an audio diary, took lots of photos, wrote a blog and collected data from the tech instruments he was wearing. As a result Alan has extensive quantitative data (bio-sensing and location) and qualitative data (text, images and some audio). There are challenges in analysing individual kinds of data, including merging similar data streams, entity identification, time-series and textual data mining, dealing with provenance, ontologies for paths, and journeys. There are also challenges for author and third-party annotation, linking the data-sets and visualising the merged narrative or facets of it.

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    WAIS seminar: Application Performance Monitoring and Architecture Discovery with Kieker
    Wednesday 23rd April 2014 Speaker(s): Willi Hasselbring Organiser: Leslie Carr Time: 23/04/2014 14:00-15:00 Location: B32/3077 File size: 802Mb Abstract The internal behavior of large-scale software systems cannot be determined on the basis of static (e.g., source code) analysis alone. Kieker provides complementary dynamic analysis capabilities, i.e., monitoring/profiling and analyzing a software system's runtime behavior. Application Performance Monitoring is concerned with continuously observing a software system's performance-specific runtime behavior, including analyses like assessing service level compliance or detecting and diagnosing performance problems. Architecture Discovery is concerned with extracting architectural information from an existing software system, including both structural and behavioral aspects like identifying architectural entities (e.g., components and classes) and their interactions (e.g., local or remote procedure calls). In addition to the Architecture Discovery of Java systems, Kieker supports Architecture Discovery for other platforms, including legacy systems, for instance, inplemented in C#, C++, Visual Basic 6, COBOL or Perl. Thanks to Kieker's extensible architecture it is easy to implement and use custom extensions and plugins. Kieker was designed for continuous monitoring in production systems inducing only a very low overhead, which has been evaluated in extensive benchmark experiments. Please, refer to http://kieker-monitoring.net/ for more information.

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    WAIS seminar: Computer Science, the Revolution in Schools
    Tuesday 22nd April 2014 Speaker(s): Sue Sentance Organiser: Leslie Carr Time: 22/04/2014 15:00-16:00 Location: B32/3077 File size: 698 Mb Abstract Until recently, "computing" education in English schools mainly focused on developing general Digital Literacy and Microsoft Office skills. As of this September, a new curriculum comes into effect that provides a strong emphasis on computation and programming. This change has generated some controversy in the news media (4-year-olds being forced to learn coding! boss of the government’s coding education initiative cannot code shock horror!!!!) and also some concern in the teaching profession (how can we possibly teach programming when none of the teachers know how to program)? Dr Sue Sentance will explain the work of Computing At School, a part of the BCS Academy, in galvanising universities to help teachers learn programming and other computing skills. Come along and find out about the new English Computing Revolution - How will your children and your schools be affected? - How will our University intake change? How will our degrees have to change? - What is happening to the national perception of Computer Science?

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    WAIS seminar: Linked Cultural Media
    Wednesday 9th April 2014 Speaker(s): Guus Schreiber Time: 09/04/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B32/3077 File size: 546Mb Abstract In this talk I will discuss linked data for museums, archives and libraries. This area is known for its knowledge-rich and heterogeneous data landscape. The objects in this field range from old manuscripts to recent TV programs. Challenges in this field include common metadata schema's, inter-linking of the omnipresent vocabularies, cross-collection search strategies, user-generated annotations and object-centric versus event-centric views of data. This work can be seen as part of the rapidly evolving field of digital humanities. Speaker Biography Guus Schreiber Guus is a professor of Intelligent Information Systems at the Department of Computer Science at VU University Amsterdam. Guus’ research interests are mainly in knowledge and ontology engineering with a special interest for applications in the field of cultural heritage. He was one of the key developers of the CommonKADS methodology. Guus acts as chair of W3C groups for Semantic Web standards such as RDF, OWL, SKOS and REFa. His research group is involved in a wide range of national and international research projects. He is now project coordinator of the EU Integrated project No Tube concerned with integration of Web and TV data with the help of semantics and was previously Scientific Director of the EU Network of Excellence “Knowledge Web”.

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    WAIS seminar: Mathematics for Web Science: Part 3-3
    ABSTRACT In the first two seminars we looked at the evolution of Ontologies from the current OWL level towards more powerful/expressive models and the corresponding hierarchy of Logics that underpin every stage of this evolution. We examined this in the more general context of the general evolution of the Web as a mathematical (directed and weighed) graph and the archetypical “living network” In the third seminar we will analyze further some of the startling properties that the Web has as a graph/network and which it shares with an array of “real-life” networks as well as some key elements of the mathematics (probability, statistics and graph theory) that underpin all this. No mathematical prerequisites are assumed or required. We will outline some directions that current (2005-now) research is taking and conclude with some illustrations/examples from ongoing research and applications that show great promise.

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    WAIS seminar: Ontologies on the Web: An Alternative Model
    Wednesday 2nd April 2014 Speaker(s): Stefan Decker Time: 02/04/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B2/1083 File size: 897 Mb Abstract Ontologies have been promoted and used for knowledge sharing. Several models for representing ontologies have been developed in the Knowledge Representation field, in particular associated with the Semantic Web. In my talk I will summarise developments so far, and will argue that the currently advocated approaches miss certain basic properties of current distributed information sharing infrastructures (read: the Web and the Internet). I will sketch an alternative model aiming to support knowledge sharing and re-use on a global basis.

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    WAIS seminar: Provenance Analytics and Crowdsourcing
    Wednesday 26th March 2014 Speaker(s): Dr Trung Dong Huynh Organiser: Dr Tim Chown Time: 26/03/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B32/3077 File size: 349Mb Abstract Understanding the dynamics of a crowdsourcing application and controlling the quality of the data it generates is challenging, partly due to the lack of tools to do so. Provenance is a domain-independent means to represent what happened in an application, which can help verify data and infer their quality. It can also reveal the processes that led to a data item and the interactions of contributors with it. Provenance patterns can manifest real-world phenomena such as a significant interest in a piece of content, providing an indication of its quality, or even issues such as undesirable interactions within a group of contributors. In this talk, I will present an application-independent methodology for analysing provenance graphs, constructed from provenance records, to learn about such patterns and to use them for assessing some key properties of crowdsourced data, such as their quality, in an automated manner. I will also talk about CollabMap (www.collabmap.org), an online crowdsourcing mapping application, and show how we applied the approach above to the trust classification of data generated by the crowd, achieving an accuracy over 95%.

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    WAIS seminar: Publication Workflows for Scientific Data
    Wednesday 23rd April 2014 Speaker(s): Willi Hasselbring Organiser: Leslie Carr Time: 23/04/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B32/3077 File size: 669 Mb Abstract For good scientific practice, it is important that research results may be properly checked by reviewers and possibly repeated and extended by other researchers. This is of particular interest for "digital science" i.e. for in-silico experiments. In this talk, I'll discuss some issues of how software systems and services may contribute to good scientific practice. Particularly, I'll present our PubFlow approach to automate publication workflows for scientific data. The PubFlow workflow management system is based on established technology. We integrate institutional repository systems (based on EPrints) and world data centers (in marine science). PubFlow collects provenance data automatically via our monitoring framework Kieker. Provenance information describes the origins and the history of scientific data in its life cycle, and the process by which it arrived. Thus, provenance information is highly relevant to repeatability and trustworthiness of scientific results. In our evaluation in marine science, we collaborate with the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel.

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    WAIS seminar: Research Discussion: Lab of Things? What Things?
    Wednesday 19th March 2014 Speaker(s): Kirk Martinez, Dr Jonathon S Hare and Dr Enrico Costanza Organiser: Dr Tim Chown Time: 19/03/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B32/3077 File size: 676 Mb Abstract The new WAIS seminar series features classic seminars, research discussions, tutorial-style presentations, and research debates. This seminar takes the form of a research discussion which will focus on the Internet of Things (IoT) research being undertaken in WAIS and other research groups in ECS. IoT is a significant emerging research area, with funding for research available from many channels including new H2020 programmes and the TSB. We have seen examples of IoT devices being built in WAIS and other ECS groups, e.g. in sensor networking, energy monitoring via Zigbee devices, and of course Erica the Rhino (a Big Thing!). The goal of the session is to briefly present such examples of existing Things in our lab with the intent of seeding discussion on open research questions, and therefore future work we could do towards new Things being deployed for experimentation in Building 32 or its environs. The session will discuss what 'things' we have, how they work, what new 'things' might we want to create and deploy, what components we might need to enable this, and how we might interact with these objects.

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    WAIS seminar: The Domain Name System: a magical mystery tour
    Wednesday 12th March 2014 Speaker(s): Dr Tim Chown Organiser: Time: 12/03/2014 11:00-11:50 Location: B32/3077 File size: 642 Mb Abstract The WAIS seminar series is designed to be a blend of classic seminars, research discussions, debates and tutorials. The Domain Name System (DNS) is a critical part of the Internet infrastructure. In this talk we begin by explaining the basic model of operation of the DNS, including how domain names are delegated and how a DNS resolver performs a DNS lookup. We then take a tour of DNS-related topics, including caching, poisoning, governance, the increasing misuse of the DNS in DDoS attacks, and the expansion of the DNS namespace to new top level domains and internationalised domain names. We also present the latest work in the IETF on DNS privacy. The talk will be pitched such that no detailed technical knowledge is required. We hope that attendees will gain some familiarity with how the DNS works, some key issues surrounding DNS operation, and how the DNS might touch on various areas of research within WAIS.

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    WAIS seminar:Mathematics for Web Science Part 3-2
    ABSTRACT In the first two seminars we looked at the evolution of Ontologies from the current OWL level towards more powerful/expressive models and the corresponding hierarchy of Logics that underpin every stage of this evolution. We examined this in the more general context of the general evolution of the Web as a mathematical (directed and weighed) graph and the archetypical “living network” In the third seminar we will analyze further some of the startling properties that the Web has as a graph/network and which it shares with an array of “real-life” networks as well as some key elements of the mathematics (probability, statistics and graph theory) that underpin all this. No mathematical prerequisites are assumed or required. We will outline some directions that current (2005-now) research is taking and conclude with some illustrations/examples from ongoing research and applications that show great promise.

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  50. [img] [img]
    WAIS seminar:Mathematics for Web Science Part3-1
    ABSTRACT In the first two seminars we looked at the evolution of Ontologies from the current OWL level towards more powerful/expressive models and the corresponding hierarchy of Logics that underpin every stage of this evolution. We examined this in the more general context of the general evolution of the Web as a mathematical (directed and weighed) graph and the archetypical “living network” In the third seminar we will analyze further some of the startling properties that the Web has as a graph/network and which it shares with an array of “real-life” networks as well as some key elements of the mathematics (probability, statistics and graph theory) that underpin all this. No mathematical prerequisites are assumed or required. We will outline some directions that current (2005-now) research is taking and conclude with some illustrations/examples from ongoing research and applications that show great promise.

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    WAIS/AIC Joint Seminar: Storytelling in Mixed Realities: Making Sense of the World
    Abstract "Storytelling in Mixed Realities: Making Sense of the World 1D Since the early days of civilization, the way we tell and consume stories defines how do we make sense of the world. Every new technology has an impact on our narrative artifacts. Today mobile ubiquitous digital technologies allow us to structure and distribute our narratives in novel and unprecedented ways. During this talk i will presents some old and recent projects developed in collaboration with a vast team of researchers and artists, that exemplify novel approaches to content and context through interactive storytelling and gaming. Bio Valentina Nisi is an Assistant Professor at the University of Madeira and founder and researcher at the Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute (M-ITI). Her area of investigation revolves around Digital Media Art and HCI. Her research focuses on designing and producing digitally mediated experiences in real spaces, merging culture, context and landscapes. Valentina previously worked with Glorianna Davenport and Mads Haahr at MediaLab Europe, MIT MediaLab European research partner. In 2006 she co-founded Amsterdam based non profit organization FattoriaMediale, together with Ian Oakley and Martine PostHuma de Boer, designing and producing interactive mobile stories for several Amsterdam neighbourhoods. Her work has won several Awards and been published and shown internationally,

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    WEBS2002 Group Projects: What can Flickr photographs tell us about New York City?
    In their second year, our undergraduate web scientists undertake a group project module (WEBS2002, taught by Jonathon Hare & Su White) in which they get to apply what they learnt in the first year to a practical web-science problem, and also learn about team-working. For the project this semester, the students were provided with a large dataset of geolocated images and associated metadata collected from the Flickr website. Using this data, they were tasked with exploring what this data could tell us about New York City. In this seminar the two groups will present the outcomes of their work. Team Alpha (Thomas Davidson, Adam Rann, Luke Gibbins & Ryan Dodd) will present their work on “Analysing Flickr Demographics: Identifying Optimal Advertising Locations in New York". This work aims to detect areas of high footfall for varying demographics with the aim of using this information to more accurately target advertising. Team Bravo (Thomas Rowledge, Xavier Voigt-Hill & Chloe Cripps) will present their work on “The Flickr that Never Sleeps: Observing a Changing City Through a Decade of Geotagged Uploads". This work aims to explore the broad breadth of ways in which users' interactions with Flickr captures reactions, geographical trends and the changing picture of a prominent global city.

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  53. [img] [img]
    What can Flickr photographs tell us about the world?
    In their second year, our undergraduate web scientists undertake a group project module (WEBS2002, led by Jonathon Hare & co-taught by Su White) in which they get to apply what they learnt in the first year to a practical web-science problem, and also learn about team-working. For the project this semester, the students were provided with a large dataset of geolocated images and associated metadata collected from the Flickr website. Using this data, they were tasked with exploring what this data could tell us about the world. In this seminar the two groups will present the outcomes of their work. Team Alpha (Ellie Hamilton, Clayton Jones & Alok Acharya) will present their work on "The relationship between Group Photos, Social Integration and Suicide". This work aims to explore whether levels of social integration (which Durkheim posited as a factor in "Egoistic Suicide" rates) can be predicted by measuring the proportion of photos of groups of people to photos of individuals within a geographical region. Team Bravo (Agnieszka Grzesiuk-Szolucha, Thomas Leese & Ammaar Tawil) will present their work on "Sentiment Analysis on Flickr Photo Tags to Classify a Photo as Positive or Negative, In Order to Determine the Happiness of a Country or Region". This work explores whether estimates of sentiment made by applying SentiWordNet to Flickr tags correlate with indices of world happiness and socio-economic well-being.

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    What is privacy and why can't we agree about it?
    Abstract: The concept of privacy has divided lawyers, scholars and policymakers for decades, not only in terms of whether it is a good or bad thing, but even what it is. Some say it is a human right, some that it is a prerequisite for democracy; others note that individuals are prone to breaching their own privacy and are remarkably relaxed about it, and have described various privacy paradoxes or other common inconsistencies in attitude; some argue that it is unenforceable; still others argue that it is a blocker to the knowledge economy and the socially-beneficial use of big data; and many more say that whatever its merits it is dead. In this talk, Kieron O'Hara will argue that the reason for this apparently confused disarray is that different privacy discourses are going on simultaneously, talking past each other and cheerfully committing various category errors. He sets out a series of seven types of privacy discussion, which are distinct but relatable to each other, as ! a first step towards clearing up some of the confusion, and argues that privacy itself is strongly implicated at the boundaries between the self and world. Our attitudes towards privacy depend crucially on where we wish those boundaries to be.

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    Wikipedia and Gamergate
    Abstract Introduction: This seminar is on the topic of "GamerGate", an international movement, ostensibly about "ethics in video game journalism" but which has become inextricably linked with extreme forms of online misogyny, rape and death threats towards women in the industry. It is of relevance to all Web science researchers, because it raises many issues of free speech, online governance, trolling and (not least) the representation of women in the tech industry. Our guest speaker (Mark Bernstein) is known for his criticism of the movement, and his work was featured in an article in the Guardian last week. He is a longtime collaborator in the field of hypertext and online media research, who co-orgainsed our annual international Web Science conference two years ago. Based in Boston, US, he will be speaking to us via Skype on Wednesday morning, to give us some background on the Gamergate phenomenon and to explain the recent developments regarding Wikipedia.

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    Work less, teach better and get better feedback: why we tried innovative teaching methods
    Speaker: Patrick McSweeney Organiser: Time: 15/10/2014 11:00-11:45 Location: B32/3077 Abstract Having started at Southampton in 2005 I have seen quite a few changes to the way courses are taught and studied. I will reflect on some of the interesting changes I have observed and suggest their causes. As a practical example I will talk about codestrom, a peer feedback tool for learning programming. We have found that this teaching method has improved the student experience and reduced the work load for the module team. Together we will discuss how this and other recent developments can enable other teaching innovations which benefit staff as well as students. Hopefully the new class of PhD students will be able to contribute from the point of view of having recently been undergraduate students here and else where.

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This list was generated on Mon Oct 23 22:19:54 2017 UTC.