Browse by Tags: data science seminar

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Number of items: 7.
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    Consider the Source: In Whose Interests, and How, of Big, Small and Other Data? Exploring data science through wellth scenarios.
    We're not a particularly healthy culture. Our "normal" practices are not optimised for our wellbeing. From the morning commute to the number of hours we believe we need to put in to complete a task that may itself be unreasonable, to the choices we make about time to prepare food to fit into these constraints - all these operations tend to make us feel forced into treating ourselves as secondary to our jobs. How can data help improve our quality of life? FitBits and AppleWatches highlight the strengths and limits of Things that Count, not the least of which is the rather low uptake of things like FITBITS and apple watches. So once we ask the question about how data might improve quality of life, we may need to add the caveat: pervasively, ubiquitously, in the rich variety of contexts that isn't all about Counting. And once we think about such all seeing all knowing environments, we then need to think about privacy and anonymity. That is: does everything have to be connected to the internet to deliver on a vision of improved quality of life through data? And if there is a Big Ubiquity - should we think about inverting new norms, like how to make personal clouds and personal data stores far more easy to manage - rather than outsourcing so much data and computation? In this short talk, I'd like to consider three scenarios about Going where too few humans have gone before to help others The challenges of qualitative data Supporting privacy and content to motivate thinking about data capture, re-use and re-presentation, and opportunities across ECS for machine learning, AI, infoviz and hci.

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    Data Observatories
    Abstract: The Data Observatory (DO) at the Data Science Institute (DSI) in Imperial College (IC) is the largest interactive visualisation facility in Europe, consisting of 64 monitors arranged to give 313 degree surround vision and engagement Opened in November 2015, the DO provides an opportunity for academics and industry to visualise data in a way that uncovers new insights, and promotes the communication of complex data sets and analysis in an immersive and multi-dimensional environment. Designed, built by, and housed within the DSI, the DO enables decision makers to derive new implications and actions from interrogating data sets in an innovative, unique environment. The talk will provide an overview of the DO capabilities and case studies of its use.

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    Data Stories -Engaging with Data in a Post-truth World
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    Scalable Data Integration
    Information and data integration focuses on providing an integrated view of multiple distributed and heterogeneous sources of information (such as web sites, databases, peer or sensor data etc.). Through information integration all this scattered data can be combined and queried. In this talk we are dealing with the problems of data integration, data exchange/warehousing, and query answering with or without ontologies. We present an algorithm for virtual data integration where data sources are queried in a distributed way and no centralized repository is materialized. Our algorithm processes queries in the presence of thousands of data sources in under a second. We extend this solution to virtual integration settings where domain knowledge is represented using constraints/ontologies (e.g. OWL2-QL). Subsequently, we examine the Chase algorithm which is the main tool to reason with constraints for data warehousing, and develop an optimization that performs orders of magnitude faster. We also examine hybrid solutions to data integration where both materialization/warehousing and virtual data integration are combined in order to optimize query answering. We discuss how these approaches can help set up future research directions and outline important applications to data management and analysis over integrated data.

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    Sketching the vision of a Web of Debates
    Web users have changed the Web from a means for publishing and exchanging documents to a means for sharing their feelings, beliefs, and opinions and participating in debates on any conceivable topic. Current web technologies fail to support this change: arguments and opinions are uploaded in purely textual form; as a result, they cannot be easily retrieved, processed and interlinked, and all this information is largely left unexploited. This talk will sketch the vision of Debate Web, which will enable the extraction, discovery, retrieval, interrelation and visualisation of the vast variety of viewpoints that exist online, based on machine-readable representations of arguments and opinions.

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    Spatial data integration for mapping progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals
    Abstract: The UN sustainable development goals, an intergovernmental set of 17 aspirational goals and 169 targets to be achieved by 2030, were launched last year. These include ending poverty and malnutrition, improving health and education, and building resilience to natural disasters and climate change. A particular focus across the goals and targets is achievement 'everywhere', ensuring that no one gets left behind and that progress is monitored at subnational levels to avoid national-level statistics masking local heterogeneities. How will this subnational monitoring of progress towards meeting the goals be undertaken when many countries will undertake just a single census in the 2015-2030 monitoring period? Professor Tatem will present an overview of the work of the two organizations he directs; WorldPop ( www.worldpop.org ) and Flowminder ( www.flowminder.org ); in meeting the challenges of constructing consistent, comparable and regularly updated metrics to measure a! nd map progress towards the sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries, and where the integration of traditional and new forms of data, including those derived from satellite imagery, GPS and mobile phones, can play a role.

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    The Chemistry of Data
    Abstract: In my talk I will discuss the way in which the ideas of the Data Science, Web and Semantic Web, Open Science contribute to new methods and approaches to data driven chemistry and chemical informatics. A key aspect of the discussion will be how to facilitate the improved acquisition and integration and analysis of chemical data in context. I will refer to lesions learnt in the e-Science and Digital Economy (particularly the IT as a Utility Network) programmes and the EDISON H2020 project. Jeremy G. Frey Jeremy Frey obtained his DPhil on experimental and theoretical aspects of van der Waals complexes, in Oxford, followed by a fellowship at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with Yuan Lee. In 1984 he joined the University of Southampton, where he is now Professor of Physical Chemistry and head of the Computational Systems Chemistry Group. His experimental research probes molecular organization from single molecules to liquid interfaces using laser spectroscopy from the IR to soft X-rays. In parallel he investigates how e-Science infrastructure supports intelligent access to scientific data. He is strongly committed to collaborative inter and multi-disciplinary research and is skilled in facilitating communication between diverse disciplines speaking different languages. He has successfully lead several large interdisciplinary collaborative RUCK research grants, from Basic Technology (Coherent Soft X-Ray imaging), e-Science (CombeChem) and most recently the Digital Economy Challenge area of IT as a Utility Network+, where he has successfully created a unique platform to facilitate collaboration across the social, science, engineering and design domains, working with all the research, commercial, third and governmental sectors.

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This list was generated on Tue Aug 20 01:02:34 2019 UTC.